Last edited by Darg
Thursday, December 3, 2020 | History

2 edition of Predictive modeling of hydraulic properties and their spatial distribution in layered soils found in the catalog.

Predictive modeling of hydraulic properties and their spatial distribution in layered soils

Kerby Mathew Cole

Predictive modeling of hydraulic properties and their spatial distribution in layered soils

  • 340 Want to read
  • 26 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Soil mechanics -- Mathematical models.,
  • Hydraulics -- Mathematical models.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Kerby M. Cole.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxv, 265 leaves, bound :
    Number of Pages265
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19854977M

      Spatial distributions of these properties are then computed for field and watershed scales using kriging and conditional simulation techniques. Rock coring and seismic surveys have been used to characterize layered, and highly fractured, bedrock aquifers (Urban and Pasquerell ). The results reaffirm the significance of hysteresis in subsurface flow as well as the spatial variability of soil hydraulic properties. The results of this study show that neglecting hysteresis in the soil hydraulic properties for soils of the same class is less significant than doing so for soils of different classes. Classification of soils becomes especially important for large-scale studies where the spatial and temporal variability in the hydraulic properties of soils exceeds the field sampling capabilities. Although soil-texture-based classification has been widely used, questions remain about the validity of its use from a hydraulic perspective. Analyses of flow and transport in the shallow subsurface require information about spatial and statistical distributions of soil hydraulic properties (water content and permeability, their dependence on capillary pressure) as functions of scale and direction. Measuring these properties is relatively difficult, time consuming and costly.


Share this book
You might also like
Readings in estate planning II

Readings in estate planning II

Neoliberalism, accountability, and reform failures in emerging markets

Neoliberalism, accountability, and reform failures in emerging markets

Bretton Woods Agreements Act amendments and international lending supervision

Bretton Woods Agreements Act amendments and international lending supervision

Neurologically Handicapped Children

Neurologically Handicapped Children

Studies on lake restoration by phosphorus inactivation

Studies on lake restoration by phosphorus inactivation

Memorial inscriptions at Yardley Hastings St. Andrews Church and the United Reformed Church.

Memorial inscriptions at Yardley Hastings St. Andrews Church and the United Reformed Church.

Philips Universal atlas

Philips Universal atlas

The Collected Works of Edward Sapir

The Collected Works of Edward Sapir

First section, Camden anchorage of the bridge over the Delaware River between the cities of Philadelphia, Penna., and Camden, N.J.

First section, Camden anchorage of the bridge over the Delaware River between the cities of Philadelphia, Penna., and Camden, N.J.

Celts

Celts

It can be done

It can be done

Safer skies with TCAS

Safer skies with TCAS

Children of the black-haired people

Children of the black-haired people

RACER # 2908585

RACER # 2908585

Rainbow Town

Rainbow Town

Predictive modeling of hydraulic properties and their spatial distribution in layered soils by Kerby Mathew Cole Download PDF EPUB FB2

Abstract. Quantitative knowledge of the subsurface material distribution and its effective soil hydraulic material properties is essential to predict soil water movement.

Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) is a noninvasive and nondestructive geophysical measurement method that is suitable to monitor hydraulic Cited by: 6. The predictive ability and utility of large‐scale distributed hydrologic models heavily relies on a detailed description of the spatial variability of the soil hydraulic properties, namely the water retention function (WRF) and the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity function (HCF).Cited by: Abstract Unsaturated hydraulic properties of field soils are needed for water flow and solute transport calculations in variably saturated soils.

The purpose of this study was to quantify the. Unsaturated hydraulic properties of field soils are needed for water flow and solute transport calculations in variably saturated soils. The purpose of this study was to quantify the spatial variability and spatial crosscorrelation of estimated parameter values of a flexible retention model that was fitted to measured retention data.

focussed on the treatment of the spatial distribution of lignitic fragments and their effect on the hydraulic parameters. The results were intended for analysing hypotheses about spatially variable flow and transport processes in mine soils using 2D-numerical models.

These soils exhibit an appreciable heterogeneity of hydraulic properties, which originates both from the spatial distribution of lignitic components and inclined sedimentary structures. Both types of heterogeneity may lead to preferential flow. Although it is well acknowledged that physical soil properties and hydraulic parameters have spatial dependencies (Bevington et al.

), our understanding of spatial variability of hydrophysical. According, the spatial variability of soil hydraulic properties can cause a problem of heterogeneity irrigation response or underground drainage.

The use of predictive models requires the knowledge of certain soil properties. Unfortunately, these do not always better reflect the nonlinearity of hydrodynamic soil properties. For example, the spatial distributions in the hydraulic properties of a multi-layered soil profile (,and m) were investigated by Mallants et al.

Sobieraj et al. () estimated the spatial distributions Predictive modeling of hydraulic properties and their spatial distribution in layered soils book Ks along a tropical rainforest catena (20, 30, 50, and 90 cm).

The floodplains are typical for their distinct hydraulic properties (e.g. by higher hydraulic conductivities ranging from 2 to  m.d −1 in the subsoil) compared to upper laying parts of the watershed (Miller et al.,Miller et al., ).

The soil cover in floodplains is usually formed by Fluvisols or Gleysols. Abstract This paper presents new developments of regression-based models to predict the saturated hydraulic conductivity of compacted soils from grain-size distribution.

The models incorporate. Changes in volume and pore space induced by the shrink–swell behavior of clay minerals present a challenge to predictive modeling of hydraulic properties of clayey soils. Introduction [2] Large‐scale application of hydrological models requires explicit knowledge of the soil hydraulic properties, namely the soil water retention function (WRF) and the hydraulic conductivity function (HCF).

The former is a relationship between the volumetric soil water content, θ (L 3 L −3), and the soil matric pressure head, h (L), whereas the latter relates the soil.

Geostatistics were used to describe the spatial variability of hydraulic conductivity characteristics of the soil here y, results obtained using this method were compared with.

The model was based on an observed distribution of soil hydraulic properties, which were assumed to be layered in vertical and to vary continuously in horizontal direction, and validated for. Hydraulic conductivity (K s) and effective porosity (ϕ eff) for saturated water flow are essential hydraulic properties for describing fluid and chemical transport in soil and groundwater lly, K s is predicted by pedotransfer functions of soil texture and total porosity or ϕ study shows that a more conceptual approach that uses a volume‐weighted ratio of coarser.

of underlying spatial controls. he hydropedological approach to this problem is to estimate the spatial distribution of soils, including their internal architecture and functional attributes, based on available data and pedological knowledge. his distribution is not random, and it does not typically follow some prescribed mathematical distribution.

Archived Publications. Applied Turfgrass Science (–) Crop Management (–) Forage & Grazinglands (–) Journal of Production Agriculture (–). micro-scale pore distribution and pore topology (Vogel, ). How-ever, little attention has been paid to the link between water flow and transport properties in peat, and the role of its pore characteristics.

Quinton et al. (, ) and Rezanezhad et al. (, ) studied the relationship between peat hydraulic properties and its pore. The soil profile is the critical scale for representation of soil hydrology also at larger scales.

Natural soils do not follow well‐defined hydraulic properties. Concepts are needed to model hydraulic nonequilibrium and hysteresis. Spatial patterns of functional soil types need to be identified. We attempt a characterization of the geotechnical and hydrological properties of hillslope deposits, with the final aim of providing reliable data to distributed catchment-scale numerical models for shallow landslide initiation.

The analysis is based on a dataset built up by means of both field tests and laboratory experiments over sites across Tuscany (Italy). Michal Dohnal, Jaromir Dusek, Tomas Vogel, Improving Hydraulic Conductivity Estimates from Minidisk Infiltrometer Measurements for Soils with Wide Pore‐Size Distributions, Soil Science Society of America Journal, /sssaj, 74, 3, (), ().

The spatial variability of the decline in hydraulic conductivity with depth can be associated with spatial variability of pedogenetic processes, the existence of relict soil patterns, and random inclusions of sand or silt lenses in glacial till.

The main soils in the area are the “soils of the alluvial plains” and the “soils of the Ionian coastal plain”. The soils of the alluvial plains are those formed along the fluvial channels of the rivers crossing the area.

Therefore, they are soils on alluvial and lake deposits, with variable grain size from clayey to stony. The base case simulations (S1) (Fig. 4) assume a layered waste rock pile with minor hydraulic variations.

The 4 general layers (L1–L4) were defined from sampling zones which their hydraulic parameters were shown in Table 2. Having more realistic distribution of hydraulic parameters, stochastic methods were used in scenarios 2 to 4 for studied.

As a result, there is a great interest in developing pedotransfer functions (PTFs) that predict the soil hydraulic properties from more easily measured and/or routinely surveyed soil data, such as particle size distribution, bulk density (ρ b), and soil organic carbon content (OC).

In this study, application of PTFs was carried out for Three laminar flow regimes are considered. (2) Development of a physically-based model for pore space evolution in expansive clay soils.

Changes in volume and pore space induced by the shrink-swell behavior of clay minerals present a challenge to predictive modeling of hydraulic properties of clayey soils. To study the peculiarities of anomalous consolidation processes in saturated porous (soil) media in the conditions of salt transfer, we present a new mathematical model developed on the base of the fractional-fractal approach that allows considering temporal non-locality of transfer processes in media of fractal structure.

For the case of the finite thickness domain with permeable boundaries. Soil mechanics is a branch of soil physics and applied mechanics that describes the behavior of differs from fluid mechanics and solid mechanics in the sense that soils consist of a heterogeneous mixture of fluids (usually air and water) and particles (usually clay, silt, sand, and gravel) but soil may also contain organic solids and other matter.

These models help to understand or predict the spatial distribution of species and their abundances by using a careful selection of predictors and sufficient observations.

For collecting soil data more efficiently at the field scale, soil sensors and mobile sensor platforms have been recently developed. The model may be created in one (core, column), two (plan, profile), or three dimensions, and can be designed to represent a variety of specific initial and boundary conditions as needed to answer a question.

Scale models commonly use physical properties that are similar to their natural counterparts (e.g., gravity, temperature). processes in the model. The model predicts peak flows and hydrographs in any location of the channel network and the spatial distribution of hydrological characteristics in each cell.

Hydrological processes in each grid cell are set in a cascading way, starting from a precipitation event. Welcome to the main entrance of the Online Geotechnical Engineering Library. Our geotech library provides links to useful publications such as papers, books, manuals, theses, that.

[9] Because hydraulic conductivity is embedded in sorptivity, certain measurements of the latter can be used to infer the former. One such approach is to utilize field‐based sorptivity measurements in conjunction with variations of the traditional sorptivity model [equation 4] to quantify K s [White and Perroux,].However, estimates of initial soil moisture and the soil's wetting.

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Scientific and Technical Information. Accurate knowledge of the spatial distribution of soil hydraulic properties is necessary for SGP97 soil moisture retrieval as well as for hydrologic modeling activities. Soil profiles will be described and sampled for texture, hydraulic conductivity, bulk density and porosity at the sites where the HSCaRS soil profile stations are installed.

Modeling of the Oklahoma/Arkansas Illinois River basin Using SWAT Final Report. Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality. Sudicky, E.A., A natural gradient experiment on solute transport in a sand aquifer: Spatial variability of hydraulic conductivity and its role in the dis-persion process.

Water Resour. Res. 22 (13), – Considering daily weather conditions, crop development, crop type and soil physical properties, CF is likely to occur several times during the year in all soils of the Great Lake region, except in the sandy soils (Fig.

3c). Crack flow has the potential to occur up to 15 times per year in the areas east of Lake Huron and north of Lake Ontario. Vadose zone transport if modeled more effectively by combining kriging with stochastic simulation to better represent the high degree of spatial variability usually found in the hydraulic properties of field soils.

However, kriging is a viable technique for estimating the initial mass distribution of contaminants in the subsurface. Hence, when predicting NAPL behavior in soils and aquifers, the Brooks-Corey representations of the hydraulic properties are to be preferred over those of van Genuchten (Oostrom et al., ).

Predictive models for the constitutive relations in multifluid flow systems have been proposed based on retention curves of water-air systems and values. Laboratory measurements supported predictions of a two-dimensional (2-D) numerical model, which showed that control of the collector height H and knowledge of soil hydraulic properties .One-dimensional and two-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling derived flow properties: impacts on aquatic habitat quality predictions Rohan Benjankar,1* Daniele Tonina1 and James McKean2 1 University of Idaho, Center for Ecohydraulics Research, E.

Front Street, SuiteBoise, IdahoUSA 2 US Forest Service – Rocky Mountain Research Station, E. Front Street, SuiteBoise.where I is cumulative infiltration over time t and S is the soil sorptivity. For one‐dimensional vertical infiltration, C is proportional to the soil's saturated hydraulic conductivity (K s).The ratio C/K s is ≤ 1, depending on soil type and soil moisture [Philip, ], with proposed ranges of 1/3 ≤ C/K s ≤ 2/3 [Fuentes et al., ] or ≤ C/K s ≤ [Philip, ].