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2 edition of Measurement and interpretation of crustal deformation rates associated with postglacial rebound found in the catalog.

Measurement and interpretation of crustal deformation rates associated with postglacial rebound

Measurement and interpretation of crustal deformation rates associated with postglacial rebound

semiannual report no. 3.

by

  • 209 Want to read
  • 1 Currently reading

Published by National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Technical Information Service, distributor in [Washington, DC, Springfield, Va .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Atmosphere.

  • Edition Notes

    Series[NASA contractor report] -- NASA-CR 195193., NASA contractor report -- NASA CR-195193.
    ContributionsUnited States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination1 v.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14704543M

    Learn geology crustal deformation with free interactive flashcards. Choose from different sets of geology crustal deformation flashcards on Quizlet. A geophysical interpretation of the secular displacement and gravity rates observed at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard in the Arctic -- Effects of post-glacial rebound and present-day ice melting -- Tadahiro Sato1, Jun’ichi Okuno2*, Jacques Hinderer3, Dan S. MacMillan4,5, Hans-Peter Plag6**, Olivier Francis7, Reinhard Falk8, and Yoichi Fukuda2.


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Measurement and interpretation of crustal deformation rates associated with postglacial rebound Download PDF EPUB FB2

Equations (34) and (35) are relevant to the calculation of the radial displacement response and of anomalies in the gravitational field.

Equations (37) and (38) are appropri- ate for analyses of the horizontal deformations associated with an arbitrary surface mass load. This project involves obtaining Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements in Scandinavia, and using the measurements to estimate the viscosity profile of the Earth's mantle and to correct tide-gage measurements for the rebound effect.

Several aspects of this project are : James L. Davis. measurements to estimate the viscosity profile of the Earth's mantle and to correct tide-gauge measurements for the rebound effect. Below, we report on several aspectsFile Size: KB.

Get this from a library. [Measurement and interpretation of crustal deformation rates associated with postglacial rebound]: [semiannual status report no.

4, 15 Sep. Mar. [United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration.;]. Get this from a library. Measurement and interpretation of crustal deformation rates associated with postglacial rebound: final report for the period 15 March through 14 March [James L Davis; Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.; United States.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration.]. Get this from a library. Measurement and interpretation of crustal deformation rates associated with postglacial rebound: semiannual status report no. 5 for the period 14 March through 15 September [James L Davis; United States.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration.]. Measurement and Interpretation of Crustal Deformation Rates Associated with Postglacial Rebound. By James L. Davis. Abstract. This project involves obtaining GPS measurements in Scandinavia, and using the measurements to estimate the viscosity profile of the Earth's mantle and to correct tide-gauge measurements for the rebound effect.

Author: James L. Davis. This project involves obtaining GPS Measurement and interpretation of crustal deformation rates associated with postglacial rebound book in Scandinavia, and using the measurements to estimate the viscosity profile of the Earth's mantle and to correct tide-gauge measurements for the rebound : James L.

Davis. This project involves obtaining GPS measurements in Scandinavia and using the measurements to estimate the viscosity profile of the earth's mantle and to correct tide-gauge measurements for the rebound effect. We report on several aspects of this project. The DSGS was not scheduled to be reoccupied with DOSE receivers during the report : James L.

Davis. Measurement and interpretation of crustal deformation rates associated with postglacial rebound. By James L. Davis. Abstract. Analysis of Global Positioning System (GPS) data from two sites separated by horizontal distance of only approximately m yielded phase residuals exhibiting a systematic elevation angle dependence.

One of the two GPS Author: James L. Davis. Measurement and interpretation of crustal deformation rates associated with postglacial rebound.

(GPS) measurements in Scandinavia, and using the measurements to estimate the viscosity profile of the Earth's mantle and to correct tide-gage measurements for the rebound effect.

Several aspects of this project are reportedAuthor: James L. Davis. BIFROST project: 3-D crustal deformation rates derived from GPS confirm postglacial rebound in Fennoscandia Hans-Georg Scherneck1, Jan M.

Johansson1, Martin Vermeer2, James L. Davis3, Glenn A. Milne4, and Jerry X. Mitrovica5 1Chalmers, Onsala Space Observatory, SE 92 Onsala, Sweden 2Finnish Geodetic Institute, PL 15, FI.

In Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Measurement and Interpretation of Crustal Deformation Rates Associated with Postglacial Rebound 12 p (SEE N ) Publication Date: 12/ New constraints on Laurentide postglacial rebound from absolute gravity measurements.

current short-term rates of GIA-induced crustal motion during the. Get this from a library. Measurement and interpretation of crustal deformation rates associated with postglacial rebound: semiannual report no.

[United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration.;]. Since autumn the BIFROST project has provided daily GPS solutions of geodetic positions from a network of more than 40 stations covering a large area of the Baltic shield.

This area is expected to show large vertical motion due to glacial isostatic rebound following the deglaciation at the end of the Pleistocene. This paper will discuss the inference of three-dimensional rates of crustal Cited by: BIFROST project: 3-D crustal deformation rates derived from GPS confirm postglacial rebound in Fennoscandia Article (PDF Available) in Earth Planets and Space 53(7) July with Reads.

[1] Project BIFROST (Baseline Inferences for Fennoscandian Rebound Observations, Sea‐level, and Tectonics) combines networks of continuously operating GPS receivers in Sweden and Finland to measure ongoing crustal deformation due to glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA).

We present an analysis of data collected between August and May Cited by: GPS crustal strain, postglacial rebound, and seismic hazard in eastern North America: The Saint Lawrence valley example Ste ´ phane Mazzotti and Thomas S.

James. Postglacial rebound is an important component of the GM record and controls processes in a several ways (Peltier, ; Scherer et al., ). Rebound of the earth’s crust in response to deglaciation is dependent upon the viscosity of the earth’s mantle which varies depending on the tectonic regime.

Introduction [2] Baseline Inferences for Fennoscandian Rebound Observations Sea Level and Tectonics (BIFROST) [BIFROST Project, ] is a project initiated in to directly measure the present‐day, three‐dimensional (3‐D) crustal deformation in Fennoscandia.A dense array of continuously operating GPS (Global Positioning System) receivers was deployed between Cited by: Historical relative gravity observations and the time rate of change of gravity due to postglacial rebound and other tectonic movements in Canada were performed on a network to establish gravimetric control for geophysical exploration and not to study the postglacial rebound and crustal deformation.

As that agrees in sign with the. GPS deformation in a region of high crustal seismicity: N. Cascadia forearc Article in Earth and Planetary Science Letters () April with. Crustal deformation rates from the BIFROST network have been published regularly [1,[35] [36] [37][38], largely incorporating Swedish and Finnish stations and.

At postglacial rebound time scales, the intraplate continental lithosphere typically behaves as an elastic solid. However, under exceptional conditions, the effective viscosity of the lower crust and lithospheric mantle may be as low as ∼10 20 Pa s, leading to ductile behavior at postglacial rebound time scales.

We studied the effects of a lithospheric ductile zone on postglacial rebound. Crustal deformation distribution due to the earthquake, aided by tsunami heights measurements, might clarify which would be the case. We occupied 29 sites by GPS in the area of southern Java.

We show two variants of comparison of the GPS results with vertical rates determined from tide gauges and precise levelling, first with the EOF-solution, second with the standard solution ().We use the tide gauge and levelling results of Ekman () and add the geoid motion due to the rebound model of Mitrovica et al.

().In both cases, GPS and tide gauge/levelling, we Cited by: Postglacial Deformation of the Fennoscandian Crust where R is the radius of the Earth, γ0 is normal gravity on the Earth´s surface, g& is the time derivative of observed gravity, and S()ψ is the Stokes function.

As, according to repeated high precision gravity measurements along the Fennoscandian land. Comparison of CGPS-derived vertical crustal motion to that inferred from absolute gravity measurements at Lerwick and Newlyn indicates that the CGPS rates are biased too high by around mm yr −1 (Teferle et al.

This result is somewhat tentative, however, given the small number of gravity measurements available in this by: Post-glacial rebound (also called isostatic rebound or crustal rebound) is the rise of land masses after the lifting of the huge weight of ice sheets during the last glacial period, which had caused isostatic depression.

Post-glacial rebound and isostatic depression are phases of. Tadahiro Sato, Jun'ichi Okuno, Jacques Hinderer, Daniel S.

MacMillan, Hans-Peter Plag, Olivier Francis, Reinhard Falk, Yoichi Fukuda, A geophysical interpretation of the secular displacement and gravity rates observed at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard in the Arctic—effects of post-glacial rebound and present-day ice melting, Geophysical Journal International, VolumeCited by: This joint experiment was designed to measure the long-term rate of change of gravity associated with postglacial rebound (Lambert et al., ).

Churchill, where more than 20 measurements have been made, exhibits a gravity rate of − μGal/year, the highest rate of all the sites. Download: Download full-size image; Fig. Absolute. We have been observing three‐dimensional site velocities at over 60 permanent GPS stations in the northeastern U.S for the purpose of inferring mantle viscosity and.

Global postglacial rebound studies constrain the lithosphere thickness, the upper mantle, and top lower mantle viscosity.

They lead to an elastic plate thickness of 80 to km and an average mantle viscosity of about 10 21 Pa s [ Peltier, ], possibly differentiated into a 4 × 10 20 Pa s upper mantle and a 10 22 Pa s lower mantle Cited by:   The nonelastic effect of postglacial rebound can be practically eliminated by combined measurements of vertical deformation and absolute gravity for a Maxwell viscoelastic Earth of almost any radial viscosity profile.

The underlying physics has little to do with the mathematical structure of the viscous relaxation modes, as speculated by: The rates —especially maximum rates—of eustatic sea level changes and crustal movements may offer a means of discrimination between different causation mechanisms, setting the frames of physical possibilities of proposed changes (as illustrated in the case of glacial eustasy and thermal expansion by Mörner, a, a).Therefore, this question was addressed.

Five possible models of deformation and associated strain rate patterns are tested against this data set. The models range from no deformation, to long wavelength postglacial rebound strain, to local strain concentration in relation to a locked thrust fault with a long-term slip rate of 1 mm/yr (Figs.

12C to 12E). None of these models can be. The measurements provide a near real-time record of the related crustal deformation before, during and after events. The goal is to better understand these natural processes, and use these data to reduce the earthquake and volcanic hazards associated with them.

1 INTRODUCTION. It is generally accepted that the interseismic surface strain rates in plate boundary zones reflect crustal strain rates (e.g. Kreemer et al), which are related to seismicity through the seismic coupling (Bird & Kagan ).However, the relationship between strain rates at the surface and deformation at seismogenic depths is not well known in.

Geodetic measurements obtained with the Global Positioning System (GPS) are increasingly more widely applied in geophysical studies. In this paper, we review the changes to the technology of GPS geodesy over the last five years that are responsible for this increased applicability.

We survey geophysical investigations employing GPS to measure coseismic. The glacial isostatic adjustment of the UK region has been considered in a number of recent studies. We have revisited this problem in order to: (i) highlight some key issues with regard to limitations in the ice modelling approach adopted in these studies and (ii) consider the constraints provided from observations of crustal motion available via continuous global positioning Cited by: The measurement of ocean depths and the charting of the shape or topography of the ocean floor.

Associated with tensional stress that pulls rock units apart-lengthening the crust. Basin and Range Province has fault block mountains near Nevada.

ch crustal deformation 45 Terms. vsmith Earth.Crustal Deformation Rates [10] The main result of this study is shown in Figure 2 as velocity vectors, representing the contemporary crustal deformation field along the south central section of the Andean convergent margin.

It is evident that most of the observed points are moving in a uniform and consistent fashion: parallel to the plate.